• Inspector dies after recently evicted home explodes in Omaha

    A woman who was killed when a house exploded in Omaha was a property inspector sent to check the home after a tenant was evicted, authorities said Tuesday. Clara Bender, 30, was fatally injured in the blast just after noon Monday in Omaha's Benson neighborhood. Bender died after being taken to Nebraska Medical Center, authorities said.

    Associated Press
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  • First patient to receive double hand transplant in US says limbs are non-functional

    Jeff Kepner made headlines in 2009 as the first person to receive a double hand transplant in the United States. Seven years later, 64-year-old Kepner is in the news again as he reveals the hands are completely non-functioning. “From day one I have never been able to use my hands,” Kepner told TIME in an exclusive interview. “I can do absolutely nothing. I sit in my chair all day and wear my TV out.” Kepner lost his hands to sepsis that started from a strep throat infection in 1999. He used prosthetics to help him drive and keep his job, TIME reported, neither of which he can do now. Ten years after the infection he underwent surgery at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center (UPMC) to attach

    Fox News
  • Shop workers laugh at woman's shorts, she responds with kindness

    Britain is finally experiencing the long-awaited summer and people are sporting shorts and T-shirts for the first time in a year. But one woman couldn't believe her ears when she overheard two workers at Superdrug, a health and beauty shop, making rude comments and sneering at her appearance.  SEE ALSO: People are sharing the meanest backhanded compliments they've received After the incident Harriet Rae, from Cornwall, posted an open letter on Facebook along with a picture of the "cheesy smile" she showed to the women: "To the two girls working in Truro Superdrug this afternoon. Don't worry, I heard the comments you made to each other about my appearance and my shorts," she wrote. "You spoke

    Mashable
  • Explorers spot mysterious purple orb on ocean floor

    The research vessel Nautilus is a floating laboratory equipped with cameras that can peer deep down to the ocean floor. Researchers with the Ocean Exploration Trust posted a video on Monday showing an unusual find. The Nautilus spied a small bright-purple orb underwater at the Channel Islands off the coast of California in the US. The main focus for the vehicle's Channel Islands mission is to study deep-sea corals, but the odd sphere attracted the scientists' attention. The video includes a soundtrack of the researchers making real-time observations as the camera sweeps along. They call it a "purple blob" and then wonder aloud "What is that?" The researchers throw out some scientific names as

    CNET
  • Aaron Rodgers reveals the true meaning of Peyton Manning's 'Omaha' call

    Thanks to Aaron Rodgers, the mystery of Peyton Manning's 'Omaha' call has finally been solved. For years, football fans everywhere have tried to solve the riddle of the 'Omaha' call, only to come up empty. The frustration has finally come to an end though because Rodgers spilled the beans during a recent appearance on the HBO show Any Given Wednesday. During the interview, host Bill Simmons asked Rodgers who he tries to emulate at the quarterback position. The Packers quarterback mentioned that he'll occasionally watch film on guys like Manning, Drew Brees, and Tom Brady. During an extra segment after the show, Rodgers went into even more detail on what he likes about Manning "I like watching

    CBS Sports
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  • No, Megyn Kelly Should Not Have Worn That Dress

    Megyn Kelly reported on the Republican National Convention while wearing a spaghetti strap dress. The internet went crazy: people saying she was inappropriately dressed and people saying we should all shut up about her dress because you go girl, or whatever. Here's the deal: Society has norms, and when you go against those norms you're going to get backlash. There's a reason that employees at Target wear khaki pants and red shirts, and the cashier at Burger King wears a uniform and a reason you put on a suit when you go for a job interview. Your clothing is a symbol that indicates who you are. You don't see emo teens wearing pink party dresses, and you don't see biker gangs wearing tuxedos. Everyone

    Inc Magazine
  • Porsche Left a Cheeky Message On the 911 GT3 Acura Bought to Develop the NSX

    A note to any automakers benchmarking cars built by Porsche: They will find you, and they'll probably leave you goofy messages hidden somewhere in the car. That's what happened when the 911 GT3 Acura was using to help develop the NSX's steering went back to the dealer for a recall service. As many automakers do, Acura bought its 911 GT3 anonymously, but Porsche was able to figure out who it belonged to when it looked at the car's black-box data, according to Automotive News. It was at this point that Porsche decided to have a little bit of fun with its counterparts at Acura. "Good luck Honda from Porsche. See you on the other side," read a note left under the 911 GT3's engine cover, according

    Road & Track
  • The U.S. is apparently using anti-drone rifles against the Islamic State

    A tweet posted last week by Peter Singer, a co-author of the book Ghost Fleet and a strategist at the New America Foundation, shows his book couched up against what appears to be a Battelle DroneDefender anti-drone rifle in a tent at Fire Base Bell outside Makhmour, Iraq. The advent and proliferation of small, cheap drones has had a lasting effect on the battlefields of the 21st century. The presence of a U.S. anti-drone system, while a seemingly sensible counter-measure against the Islamic State’s fondness for using the remote-controlled aircraft, is a small glimpse into how the American military is adapting to evolving battlefield threats in the wake of its two protracted ground wars in Iraq and Afghanistan.

    Washington Post